Tag Archives: Technology for the Classroom

EDU 6134 – Application of Learning

For this assignment, I chose to create a newsletter about many positive aspects of technology in the classroom. During my internship, I have found that I continually integrate technology into the classroom as way to engage my students in learning and encourage them to think in new and creative ways. Application of Learning Page 1Application of Learning Page 2 & 3

Application of Learning Page 4

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ISTE Standard 6: Implementing iAgents into our Schools

ISTE Standard 6: Technology Operations and Concepts

Question: How can school districts utilize the technological knowledge of Digital Native Students?

Article: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-08-20/news/ct-tl-lkw-schools-tech-support-20130821_1_six-students-lake-zurich-high-school-google-chromebooks 

In the article Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Marc Prensky’s (2001) wrote that our students today are, for the majority, “native speakers” of the digital language of computers, video games and the Internet. This got me to thinking. As many educators are from the pre-digital age and may iAgent_Help_Desknot be as tech-savvy as our students, how can we utilize their technological knowledge to benefit our schools? In the article, School Districts to Use Kids to Help Troubleshoot Tech Issues, Dan Waters (2013) reports on a school district in Chicago that is utilizing its tech-savvy high school students by creating a group of high school students called iAgents. The iAgents were on hand, during the summer and the first week of school, to pass out and set up each of the student body’s iPads and Chromebooks for the coming school year. According to Water’s, the high schools had the iAgents manning a help desk in the library during students’ lunch periods to assist with any issues that would arise as well as the managing of online forums where kids could post questions about how to access class materials and lessons, among other topics.

These iAgents are such a great example of students demonstrating a sound understanding of technological concepts, systems and operations. What I like most about what this school is doing is that it is creating a place for tech-savvy kids to become creative, helpful and needed. I know that a lot of my students have a hard time finding a place to fit in within our high school. I think that if we had a program that offered students the ability to work with technology and use the skills that they excel at, our students would find a sense of pride and accomplishment that they may not have felt before. I love that this program creates peer interaction between students and encourages teamwork.

Prensky, Marc. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon. Retrieved from http://www.albertomattiacci.it/docs/did/Digital_Natives_Digital_Immigrants.pdf

Waters, Dan. (2013). School districts to use kids to help troubleshoot tech issues. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved from http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-08-20/news/ct-tl-lkw-schools-tech-support-20130821_1_six-students-lake-zurich-high-school-google-chromebooks

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ISTE Standard 5: Where can students turn when they are being Cyberbullied??

ISTE Standard 5: Digital Citizenship

Question: When advocating for positive digital citizenship, what safeguards can schools take to help protect their students from cyberbullying?

Article: http://cyberbullying.us/setting-up-a-free-bullying-and-cyberbullying-reporting-system-with-google-voice/

Technology gives student’s anonymity and with being anonymous comes bravery. The previous ISTE standards have helped me to realize that technology can give shy students a voice; that they become more brave and autonomous when communicating online. This can be such a great feature but at the same time, it can give people the feeling of superiority cyber-bullyingand authority. According to Common Sense Education (2015), ‘students learn that cruelty can escalate quickly online because people are often anonymous and posts spread quickly.’ Cyberbullying has been in the headlines a lot of late. School aged suicides are becoming more and more common. There were 2 suicides related to the school I work at, just last year. It is our job as educators to teach positive digital citizenship and to also make sure that students have somewhere to turn when they need help.

This article if full of great information that can benefit all school districts! It teaches schools how to set up a Google Voice account that allows students to call or text when they feel that they, or someone else, is being [cyber] bullied or is in danger. Hinduja (2015) wrote, ‘we strongly believe that every school should have a system in place that allows students who experience or observe bullying or cyberbullying (or any inappropriate behavior) to report it in as confidential a manner as possible. It seems obvious that we should be using mediums that youth already prefer. In addition, being able to broach the subject without being forced to reveal one’s identity or do it face-to-face may prove valuable in alerting faculty and staff to harmful student experiences, and help promote an informed response to bring positive change.’ Schools are encouraged to hang posters, send out flyers, and use their automated school wide messaging system to make sure students know the Google Voice phone number. It is also important to make sure that students know that they can call anonymously for any reason and at any time, day or night.

Turn down the dial on cyberbullying and online cruelty. Common Sense Education.  (2015).         Retrieved from https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/turn-down-dial-          cyberbullying- and-online-cruelty-9-10

Hinduja, Sameer. (2015). Setting up a free bullying and cyberbullying reporting system with         Google voice. Cyberbullying Research Center. Retrieved from             https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/turn-down-dial-cyberbullying-and-online-cruelty-9-10

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ISTE Standard 1 : The Google Classroom

Question: What are the benefits of combining a traditional face-to-face classroom with an online classroom in a special education classroom?

This week, I have learned that the focus behind ISTE Standard 1 is to facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity through innovative thinking, the use of digital tools and resources, and partnering face-to-face and virtual environments. Technology is becoming more and more accessible in schools throughout our country. In accordance with ISTE Standagoogle classroomrd 1, the Google classroom is an innovative way to inspire student learning. Within the classroom, students can view their syllabus, create a calendar, complete assignments, work on journal entries, and collaborate with other Google products. Information can be shared instantaneously with the click of a button between students and teachers. According to Deaton et al. (2013), the application and purposeful use of software and hardware helps learners to manipulate and generate unique interpretations and to represent their knowledge flexibly and meaningfully. In turn, such approaches encourage students to become creative, critical thinkers, problem solvers, and effective users of technology. The potential for the Google classroom is vast. Students can create projects using applications such as iMovie and Prezi and link them to the classroom for their classmates to view.

Over the course of the week, my mind has been filled with numerous different project ideas for my future students using these applications. Digital storytelling is a new concept to me and I find its application possibilities very exciting. I work in a special education classroom where we strive to help our students create internship portfolios. With the use of digital storytelling, I am now looking forward to apply this concept to virtual internship portfolios.

Deaton, C. C. M., Deaton, B. E., Ivankovi, D., & Norris, F. A. (2013). Creating stop-motion videos with iPads to support student’ understanding of cell processes. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 30(2), 67-73.