Category Archives: 4. Content Knowledge

EDCT 6431 – Creating a Virtual Portfolio

For my individual project, I developed a lesson plan for my 18-21 year old transition students. The purpose of this lesson is to teach my students to use different technologies as a means for creating interactive blog pages that document their internship experiences.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Y72-QG_TDVH91iuZFsYBlwe9uUNXLPg4Y9-mGqD6tFA/edit?usp=sharing

Final Project 1

Final Project 2

Final Project 3

Final Project 4

Final Project

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ISTE Standard 6: Implementing iAgents into our Schools

ISTE Standard 6: Technology Operations and Concepts

Question: How can school districts utilize the technological knowledge of Digital Native Students?

Article: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-08-20/news/ct-tl-lkw-schools-tech-support-20130821_1_six-students-lake-zurich-high-school-google-chromebooks 

In the article Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Marc Prensky’s (2001) wrote that our students today are, for the majority, “native speakers” of the digital language of computers, video games and the Internet. This got me to thinking. As many educators are from the pre-digital age and may iAgent_Help_Desknot be as tech-savvy as our students, how can we utilize their technological knowledge to benefit our schools? In the article, School Districts to Use Kids to Help Troubleshoot Tech Issues, Dan Waters (2013) reports on a school district in Chicago that is utilizing its tech-savvy high school students by creating a group of high school students called iAgents. The iAgents were on hand, during the summer and the first week of school, to pass out and set up each of the student body’s iPads and Chromebooks for the coming school year. According to Water’s, the high schools had the iAgents manning a help desk in the library during students’ lunch periods to assist with any issues that would arise as well as the managing of online forums where kids could post questions about how to access class materials and lessons, among other topics.

These iAgents are such a great example of students demonstrating a sound understanding of technological concepts, systems and operations. What I like most about what this school is doing is that it is creating a place for tech-savvy kids to become creative, helpful and needed. I know that a lot of my students have a hard time finding a place to fit in within our high school. I think that if we had a program that offered students the ability to work with technology and use the skills that they excel at, our students would find a sense of pride and accomplishment that they may not have felt before. I love that this program creates peer interaction between students and encourages teamwork.

Prensky, Marc. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon. Retrieved from http://www.albertomattiacci.it/docs/did/Digital_Natives_Digital_Immigrants.pdf

Waters, Dan. (2013). School districts to use kids to help troubleshoot tech issues. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved from http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-08-20/news/ct-tl-lkw-schools-tech-support-20130821_1_six-students-lake-zurich-high-school-google-chromebooks

ISTE_Standard_6_iAgents

ISTE Standard 4: Let’s Make A Glog

ISTE Standard 4: Glogster

Students are able to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make decisions using digital tools and resources.Glogster

Question:  What online tools can teachers use to help students research, create and manage innovative project presentations?

Article: http://jamiethelibrarian.com/2011/05/13/three-benefits-of-using-glogster-a-21st-century-multimedia-tool-in-k-12-classrooms/ 

In this article, Jamie Renton writes about Glogster.com and how students can use this website (and app!!) to analyze and organize information and then create interactive virtual project presentations. Renton highlights 3 main benefits to this program. Firstly, Glogster increases digital literacy by using technology tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding. Additionally, Glogster enables schools to meet and educational technology and content area standards for creativity and innovation, communication and collaboration, research and information fluency, critical thinking, problem solving and decision making, and digital citizenship. Another benefit of Glogster is it gives diverse learners options for acquiring information and knowledge which facilitates problem solving and critical thinking skills. According to Kuo, Chen and Hwang (2014), research has proven that students’ high-order thinking ability, such as problem-solving, and critical thinking ability, could be effectively improved by means of searching for web-based resource. Glogster gives students the opportunity to compile the information that they have collected, organize it and present it.  This application is a great tool for creating interactive poster presentations on different research and interest topics. I like that students are able to collect data, images and videos and then pick and choose what information they add to their Glog. The downside of Glogster is it is not free and requires a yearly registration fee of approximately $95 per year.

Kuo, F. R., Chen, N. S., & Hwang, G. J. (2014). A creative thinking approach to enhancing the web-based problem solving performance of university students. Computers & Education, 72(c), 220–230

Glogster Coogle

ISTE Standard 1 : The Google Classroom

Question: What are the benefits of combining a traditional face-to-face classroom with an online classroom in a special education classroom?

This week, I have learned that the focus behind ISTE Standard 1 is to facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity through innovative thinking, the use of digital tools and resources, and partnering face-to-face and virtual environments. Technology is becoming more and more accessible in schools throughout our country. In accordance with ISTE Standagoogle classroomrd 1, the Google classroom is an innovative way to inspire student learning. Within the classroom, students can view their syllabus, create a calendar, complete assignments, work on journal entries, and collaborate with other Google products. Information can be shared instantaneously with the click of a button between students and teachers. According to Deaton et al. (2013), the application and purposeful use of software and hardware helps learners to manipulate and generate unique interpretations and to represent their knowledge flexibly and meaningfully. In turn, such approaches encourage students to become creative, critical thinkers, problem solvers, and effective users of technology. The potential for the Google classroom is vast. Students can create projects using applications such as iMovie and Prezi and link them to the classroom for their classmates to view.

Over the course of the week, my mind has been filled with numerous different project ideas for my future students using these applications. Digital storytelling is a new concept to me and I find its application possibilities very exciting. I work in a special education classroom where we strive to help our students create internship portfolios. With the use of digital storytelling, I am now looking forward to apply this concept to virtual internship portfolios.

Deaton, C. C. M., Deaton, B. E., Ivankovi, D., & Norris, F. A. (2013). Creating stop-motion videos with iPads to support student’ understanding of cell processes. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 30(2), 67-73.