Monthly Archives: July 2015

ISTE Standard 3: Classroom in a Box

ISTE Standard 3: Classroom in a Box

Question: How can the use of a digital learning environment be used to create personalized, interactive and engaging learning?

Article: Samsung’s Classroom in a Box lets Schools Test Drive 1:1

I love the idea of incorporating technology into the classroom. My positive experience with the Google Classroom has helped me to become comfortable with the idea of integrating online classrooms into our traditional classroom. I have found that students are more open to contributing ideas to online discussions, use additional creativity to formulate and execute their ideas and projects, and show an excitement for online learning. According to Peter Cookson Jr., a principal researcher for Education Sector, ‘Technology for instruction, if done well, allows students to reach out to a much broader world. Students today are comfortable with turning on a computer for learning. It’s not novel or unusual for them. The challenge is to use the technology creatively to meet learning goals” (Wong, 2014). Cookson makes an excellent point. Students today are tech-savvy. They have iPhones and tablets that they bring to school each day. It only makes sense to utilize the technology they are already using to enhance their education. Wylie Wong wrote, “Admittedly, new technology helps meet Common Core State Standards and online standardized testing requirements. But educators say their ultimate goal is to prepare students for success by helping them develop modern skills” (Wong, 2014).

The new Classroom in a Box goes beyond the integrated idea of the Google classroom. In the ‘box’ are all of the components needed to convert classrooms into one-to-one learning environments. The package includes 30 devices — either Galaxy Tab 4 Education tablets or Chromebook 2 notebooks — along with professional development solutions, and subscriptions and licenses for curriculums. Samsung partnered with McGraw-Hill to bulk up on digital curriculum offerings. The textbook publisher will provide 30 one-year subscriptions to its Thrive digital curriculum, which covers Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts (ELA) and math for grades 3-8 (Smith, 2015). This is a great opportunity for teachers to try out the program for a year before their district makes a financial commitment. The idea behind this technology is to integrate online classrooms into the traditional classroom thus creating a personalized, interactive and engaging learning experience.

Smith, D. Frank. (2015). Samsung’s classroom in a box lets schools test-drive 1:1. EdTech Focus on K-23. Retrieved from http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2015/07/samsung-s-classroom-box-lets-schools-test-drive-11

Wong, W. (2014). How technology enables blended learning. EdTech Focus on K-12. Retrieved from http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2014/04
/how-technology-enables-blended-learning

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ISTE Standard 2: Twitter in the Classroom

Question: How can teachers use Twitter to facilitate discussion, relay information and create collaboration?

twitterThe focus of the ISTE Standard 2 is to help facilitate the use of digital media in the classroom in an effort to create quality discussion and effective collaboration between teachers and students. According to the National Education Association, the social media phenomenon, Twitter, is being used by educators ‘to enrich their classrooms.’ Teachers are using Twitter to review previous lessons, remind students of future lessons and create discussion in 140 characters or fewer. Students are then able to post questions or comments which facilitates discussion and collaboration. One teacher claimed that he used Twitter to keep his students thinking after class had ended. Michelle Lampinen, a high school teacher, makes use of blogging by creating lessons that ‘address multiple Common Core standards, hold students accountable while minimizing stress, be structured enough to provide clarity while giving freedom to experiment, be varied enough to keep students engaged, and get students to write for multiple purposes.’ Assignments such as these can also be adapted for use on Twitter. Many school districts around the country are encouraging educators to use social media to enhance their classrooms.

I love the idea of using Twitter as a mean for communication and collaboration within the classroom. I believe that by using social media, students who may be quiet or shy in the classroom, may find their voice among the message boards. Many older students are already using Twitter as a means of communication, through posting their own tweets and following their friends. It seems like a natural progression to integrate this type communication into the classroom as it has the potential to engage students in learning by using a format that they already enjoy!

http://www.nea.org/home/32641.htm (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)

Lampinen, M. (2013). Blogging in the 21st-century classroom. Edutopia. Retrieved from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/blogging-in-21st-century-classroom-
michelle-lampinen

ISTE Standard 1 : The Google Classroom

Question: What are the benefits of combining a traditional face-to-face classroom with an online classroom in a special education classroom?

This week, I have learned that the focus behind ISTE Standard 1 is to facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity through innovative thinking, the use of digital tools and resources, and partnering face-to-face and virtual environments. Technology is becoming more and more accessible in schools throughout our country. In accordance with ISTE Standagoogle classroomrd 1, the Google classroom is an innovative way to inspire student learning. Within the classroom, students can view their syllabus, create a calendar, complete assignments, work on journal entries, and collaborate with other Google products. Information can be shared instantaneously with the click of a button between students and teachers. According to Deaton et al. (2013), the application and purposeful use of software and hardware helps learners to manipulate and generate unique interpretations and to represent their knowledge flexibly and meaningfully. In turn, such approaches encourage students to become creative, critical thinkers, problem solvers, and effective users of technology. The potential for the Google classroom is vast. Students can create projects using applications such as iMovie and Prezi and link them to the classroom for their classmates to view.

Over the course of the week, my mind has been filled with numerous different project ideas for my future students using these applications. Digital storytelling is a new concept to me and I find its application possibilities very exciting. I work in a special education classroom where we strive to help our students create internship portfolios. With the use of digital storytelling, I am now looking forward to apply this concept to virtual internship portfolios.

Deaton, C. C. M., Deaton, B. E., Ivankovi, D., & Norris, F. A. (2013). Creating stop-motion videos with iPads to support student’ understanding of cell processes. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 30(2), 67-73.